Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Bad Bad Bedbugs Everywhere

Seems like everywhere I turn these days I run across something having to do with bedbugs. In recent days I have learned about numerous companies that offer natural remedies for bedbug infestations. (No, heavy metal music is not one of the remedies being offered; it just gets them fired up and chases away every other guest in your hotel.) Seriously, I really should not joke about bedbugs; they are no laughing matter. Just two weeks ago, The Daily Times in Farmington, N.M., reported that the owner of a Days Inn was spending $63,000 to get rid of the little critters. "We are replacing everything," said Rez Chowdhury, who owns the bedbug-infested structure. (See article.)

I will be writing about natural bedbug solutions soon. Be sure to watch for the article that will include everything from bug-sniffing canines, to heat treatments, to tiny sensors, to natural oils. When I go to sleep tonight, I will try not think about the fact that female bedbugs can lay up to 500 eggs in a lifetime. The size of the eggs? A speck of dust. Yikes!

5 comments:

Matt D. said...

I also have noticed all of the news stories about bed bugs lately, but to me it seems like the media runs with the bed bug story every 5 years or so.

In my opinion it's just an example of media fear mongering they run with every few years in rotation. Super flus, and staph infections are two other examples of this.

Glenn Hasek said...

Matt, thank you for your comment. You may be right but it seems the experts are saying this round of infestation is worse. We'll see....

nobugs said...

I run a bed bug blog and forum. Bed bugs (cimex lectularius) were an uncommon occurrence from the 1950s to the last 5-10 years.

The problem is bad and entomologists tell us they will be a more common domestic pest than termites or cockroaches by next year. Of course, they're a big problem for the lodging industry as a whole.

There are some green solutions, including thermal heat and diatomaceous earth, which can be part of a remediation program (and DE can help with prevention also).

Several new monitors are going to be coming out in the next few months which should help a lot also. But it's worth going out of your way to catch them early.

Jim said...

Diatomaceous earth is a great non toxic way to dehydrate them, but it is very important to determine what type of bug you have. If it's Bat Bugs, then you can treat for bugs all you like and never see an end.

Anonymous said...

This article is very alarming. I am a frequent traveler and the owner of Ohio Mattress Recovery and Recycling. Our company was formed to help solve this problem. Many companies are currently donating these mattresses to people who are unaware of this epidemic.
www.ohiomattressrecovery.com